White, Stewart Edward: The Silent Places
(researched by Charles Jordan)

Assignment 1: Bibliographical Description
1 First edition publication information (publisher, place, date, etc.)
Publisher-McClure, Phillips & Co. Place-New York date-published April 1904 copyright- 1904
2 First edition published in cloth, paper, or both? If both, simultaneous or staggered?
The first edition is published in cloth
3 JPEG image of cover art from first edition, if available
4 Pagination
16
8 leaves [14] pp 3-304 [10] (leaves with illustrations that do not disturb the number sequence and are unnumbered occur between pages 26-27, 66-67, 148-149, 228-229, 258-259, and 294-295)
5 Edited or Introduced? If so, by whom?
Neither edited nor inroduced
6 Illustrated? If so, by whom?
Illustrated by Philip R. Goodwin
7 JPEG image of sample illustration, if available
8 General physical appearance of book (Is the physical presentation of the text attractive? Is the typography readable? Is the book well printed?)
The physical appearance of the book is very attractive. The text is neatly placed on each page with 1and 3/4 inch bottom margins and 1 and 1/4 inch side margins. The title is displayed at the top of all even numbered pages, and the current chapter i
s located at the top of all odd numbered pages. The typography is very readable, with adequate space between lines and words. The book appears to be well printed-the lettering does not smear, and there are no blotch marks or other physical blemishes.
9 JPEG image of sample chapter page, if available
10 Paper (Assess the original quality of the paper used for the book. Is the paper in the copy or copies you examined holding up physically over time?)
The paper appears to be holding up fairly well, with slight discoloration around the top and bottom edges. The bottom edges of the pages are uneven since several of the pages are of different length since some have shrunk with age. Unlike the top e
dge of the pages, the bottom edge is not even and smooth, but rippled and rough. The paper is of good quality, heavyweight and fairly durable.
11 Description of binding(s)
The outside cover of the book is blue. The binding is in fair condition, and the outside cover of the bin
ding shows wear in all four corners. At the top of the spine is the title of the book written in gold lettering. Just beneath the title is the authors name also written in gold lettering. At the very bottom of the spine is the name of the publishing, w
hich is of course written in gold lettering. At the top of the book's front cover is the title, which is imprinted into the cover giving a textured look and feel. At the bottom of the front cover is the authors name imprinted into the cover. Both are
done in gold lettering. Between the title and author is a reddish-brown colored picture of pine tree branches also imprinted into the cover. The binding is glued not stitched, and over the years the book's cover and the binding have come detatched. Th
e first and last pages of the book hold the cover onto the bound pages. No pages are missing, and the pages appear to still be held together well. No pages are loose from the bindings.
12 Transcription of title page
| THE SILENT PLACES | BY | STEVVART EDVVARD VVHITE | Illustrated by Philip R. Goodvvin | NEW YORK | McCLURE, PHILLIPS & CO.
13 JPEG image of title page, if available
14 Manuscript Holdings
I was unable to locate the known location for the manuscript of The Silent Places
15 Other (typograpical information from title page, etc.)
The book is written in the times new r
oman font. On the last several pages of the novel there are several advertisements for the works of other authors published by McClure, Phillips & Co. The advertisments include author, title, and a brief summary or critical acclaim from various newspape
rs or critics. The price of the book is also included.
Assignment 2: Publication and Performance History
1 Did the original publisher issue the book in more than one edition? If so, briefly describe distinguishing features of each (illustrations, cover art, typography, etc.); if not, enter N/A
Though I was unable to locate any source which verified that the original publisher issued the book in only one hardback edition, I have see
n several copies of the book by the original publsiher-all of which are hardback The book continues to be printed in a hardback edition.
2 JPEG image of cover art from one subsequent edition, if available
3 JPEG image of sample illustration from one subsequent edition, if available
4 How many printings or impressions of the first edition?
I called the publisher, and they said their records did not go back as far as 1904. I am still awaiting a call from a rare books dealer who trades through the internet. He may have this inf
ormation or links to where I could obtain this information. I do know there are at least 7 impressions of the first edition, because I saw a 7th impression of the first edition advertised for sale in Bibliofind. Besides that I found no source containing
the number of impressions for the first edition.
5 Editions from other publishers? If so, list their dates and publishers; if not, enter N/A
In 1908, Doubleday, Page & Co. aquired McClure publishing Co. Publishings by other publishers include Doubleday, Page & Co. in 1909, 1919, 1923, 1928. Grosset & Dunlap in 1909, 1921. Buccaneer Books
Incorporated, 1976. Amereon Limited, date not provided. Lightyear Press, June 1976. London: Hodder and Stroughton, 1904. Toronto: Morang & Co., 1904.
6 Last date in print?
According to Lightyear Press, the book is not officially "out of print" but the title is "out of stock indefinitely" at the publisher. According to worldcat, the book was listed under the browser-books in print....but it looks as if a copy of the
book has not officially been printed since 1976.
7 Total copies sold? (source and date of information?)
The only information pertaining to total copies sold was from The Bookman which works on a point system based on popularity but does not provide actual sales figures. According to Bookman, The Silent Pl
aces amassed 400 total points for the year 1904, making it the seventh best selling book for that year. The Silent Places did not receive enough points any subsequent years to be ranked with best sellers of subsequent years.
8 Sales figures by year? (source and date of information?)
The only information pertai
ning to total copies sold was from The Bookman which works on a point system based on popularity but does not provide actual sales figures. According to Bookman, The Silent Places amassed 400 total points for the year 1904, making it the seventh best sel
ling book for that year. The Silent Places did not receive enough points any subsequent years to be ranked with best sellers of subsequent years.
Again, the only sales figures I could come up with came from The Bookman. At the end of each month, The Bookman lists the top six selling books based on points. In the year 1904, The Silent Places made the top six list a total of four times. In July
of 1904, The Silent Places topped the chart with 150 total points. The book fell to number two in the month of August with a total of 105 points, and in September the book dropped to number six receiving only 51 points. In October, The Silent Places mad
e the chart for its fourth consecutive month and rebounded to take the number four spot with 94 points. The book failed to make the list in November or December. The Silent Places finished the year as the seventh best selling book with 400 total points
for that year.
9 Advertising copy (transcribe significant excerpts, briefly identify where ads were placed)
|For Everybody | "The Silent Places" appears in the | N.Y. Tribune's list of best-selling books| this vveek. | Reason: Its universal appeal. It is a | man's book, for its truth to local color | and excitement; a vvoman's book for its | love-roma
nce and tragedy; the young | people have here a chance for real hero-vvorship | And the literary folks are speaking of Mr. VVhite's extrodinary| artistic development in so fevv years | It's a novel for everybody This advertisement was found in the May
21, 1904 publishing of The Publisher's Weekly. Ads for The Silent Places can be found throughout editions of Publisher's Weekly after April 1904. Additional advertisements are located in other Stewart Edward White publications occuring after The Silen
t Places.
10 JPEG image of sample advertisement, if available
11 Other promotion
Other promotions include the author's own commentary about The Silent Places in publications of Stewart Edward White's Gold. In the 1913 novel, there is an essay by Eugene Saxton located at the back which outlines the history behind ea
ch of his previous novels. Saxton reveals that White wrote the book "during the ruffed grouse season in Michigan. This historical overview also shares with the reader White's own impression of The Silent Places. Saxton states that White considers The
Silent Places "the best example of 'literary atmosphere' he knows".
12 Performances in other media? If so, list media, date, title, production information; if not, enter N/A
The book was put on six sound cassettes (ca. 372 min) by Books in Motion, Spokane WA 1995. It is the unabridged version, and is read by David Sharp. The book also appears on Microfi
lm. Located at Woodbridge Conn (American Fiction IV, 1901-1905 reel 248 no. 2435.
13 Translations? If translated, give standard bibliographic information for each translation. If none, enter N/A
The book was translated into French by Paris: Librairie Stock, 1921. The title in French is Terres De Silence. It is the Huitieme edition.
14 Serialization? If serialized, give standard bibliographic information for serial publication. If none, enter N/A
Silent Places appeared as
a seriel in "Outing" magazine. In the November 1903 edition of Outing magazine, chapters 1-5 appeared, in December 1903, chapters 6-9, in January of 1904, chapters 10-13, in February of 1904 14-16, in March of 1904 chapters 17-20, in April of 1904 chapte
rs 21-24, in May of 1904 chapters 25-28, and the concluding three chapters, 29-34 appeared in June 1904.
15 Sequels/Prequels? Give standard bibliographic information for each. If none, enter N/A
I saw several advertisements, none giving any mention to any prequels to The Silent Places. I checked several of his later publications, and none
where introduced as the sequel to The Silent Places. Beyond this, I found no written example or text saying whether the novel was a sequel or not. The same is true for it having a prequel.
Assignment 3: Biographical Sketch of the Author
1 Paste your biographical sketch here (maximum 500 words)
Stewart Edward White, an American male, was born March 12, 1873 at Grand Rapids Michigan. He was born to Thomas Stewart White, a successful lumberman, and Mary Eliza (Daniell) White. Through his father's side of
the family, Stewart was a descendant of John White, who came to the American colonies in 1632 and later became known as the founder of Cambridge Massachusetts, the place where he first settled. His mother hailed from Hoosick Falls, New York. During the
early part of his childhood, Stewart and his father traveled from one lumber town to the next all throughout northern Michigan. In his early teen years, between ages 12 and 16, he and his father moved out west to the lumber ranches of California. It wa
s this early exposure to the outdoors life that later became the basis for some of his writing. At the age of sixteen, he returned to Grand Rapids and enrolled in Central High School. Two years later, Stewart graduated from high school and headed for th
e woods of Michigan. Here, from 1888-1891 he wrote between 30 and 40 articles on birds, which became his first published writings. Following his three year excursion in the woods, he enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1891. He obtained a Ph.B degree from the University of Michigan in 1895.
For the next six months following college, Stewart was employed at a packing house in Grand Rapids and then became part of the gold rush to the Black Hills of South Dakota. After quickly running out of money, he decided to enroll at Columbia Law School.
It was at Columbia where his literary career got its first start. An English professor, Brander Matthews, convinced Stewart to attempt to sell a short story he had written in class entitled A Man and His Dog. In 1897-1898 at the age of 24 or 25, the s
tory was purchased for $15.00 by Short Stories, making this his first paid piece of literature. Following his stay at Columbia, he worked briefly for a Chicago book-selling store called A.C. McClurg but soon returned to the forests of Michigan and became
a umberjack. During this time he not only continued to gather material for later novels, but also wrote his first two full length novels The Westerners (1901) and The Claim Jumpers (1901). With the publication of The Blazed Trails in 1902, Stewart was ackn
owledged as a member of the "red blood school of writers", which included such authors as Jack London and Bret Harte. During the next four decades, he produced nearly thirty pieces of literature, more than fifty volumes in his lifetime, which included Th
e Westerners (1901) The Forest (1903), The Mountains (1904), The Riverman (1908), Gold (1913), and one of his most famous novels, The Silent Places (1904). Stewart considers The Silent Places the greatest example of "literary atmosphere" he knows. In 19
13 he traveled to Africa, and was later named a fellow of the Royal Geographic Society in London, based on his extensive map work of the German East African jungles. He married his wife, Elizabeth Calvert Grant, on April 28, 1904. They never had childre
n. In the latter stages of his career, Stewart wrote on parapsychology and psychical. Some of his papers are located at the University of Michigan Library, University of Oregon Library, University of California Berkley Library, and the Syracuse Universi
ty Library. He died September 18, 1946 following an operation at the University of California Hospital,in San Fransico where he resided,at age 73.
Assignment 4: Reception History
1 Paste contemporary reception history in here (maximum 500 words)
The following lists the sources where critical reviews of Stewart Edward White's 'The Silent Places'can be found:
*1)Bookman Vol 19 pgs 305-307 Ap2. B78 *2)Natiion Vol 78 pgs 499-500 June 23, 1904 *3)Dial Vol 36 pg 370 1904 Ap2. D48 4)Canadian Vol 23 pg 282 1904 Ap5. C12 5)Reader Vol 4 pgs 112-113 June Ap2. N2 *6)Outlook Vol 77 pg 425 June, 18 1904
The following were found in the Facts on File Bibliography of American Fiction 1866-1918 and were catagorized under critical studies. Both may be good sources for critical reviews of 'The Silent Places', but I was unable to personally obtain any inform
ation from them. 1) Judy Alter 'Stewart Edward White 2) Edna Rosemary Butte 'Stewart Edward White; His Life and Literary Career.
I was only able to obtain copies of the reviews found in the Bookman, Nation, Outlook and Dial. There were many similarities between the four different reviews. The most striking similarity was that each review compared Mr. Edward's 'The Silent Places
' to his earlier work, 'Conjurors' House'. All four reviews find the two stories to exhibit many likenesses in both subject matter and setting. The Dial opens with, "Those familiar with Mr. Stewart Edward White's "Conjurors' House" will find the s
ame material used in his latest work "The Silent Places". Mr. Churchill Williams in his Bookman review writes, "The present story (The Silent Places) is of the same genesis as the sketch which was reviewed a year or more ago in these columns under the ti
tle "Conjurors' House"'. Though the Bookman takes the most anaylitical approach, all four reviews devote a majority of their content outlining the book's plot. Each review gives a basic plot line along with the names of important characters and how t
hey contribute to the story. Each review makes reference to White's particular attention to and life-like imagery of Natural settings. The Nation starts off by saying, "Few of the story-tellers who go to the utttermost ends of the earth for treasure fare so well as Mr.
Stewart Edward White". The Bookman review adds, "Of what this wilderness of the North means Mr. White comes nearer to giving us a conception than anyone who has yet written of it". Outlook boasts that White is " a true nature-lover and a master of woodc
raft-two things not often combined in one writer. Though all four reviews share several things in common, the Bookman review inspects the book's literary merit the closest.
Mr. Churchill Williams' review of 'The Silent Places' found in the Bookman provides the most in-depth and complete review of the book. Williams sees 'The Silent Places' as a novel in which Mr. White attempts to explore further into human emotion tha
n any of his earlier works. Yet, Williams views the novel as nothing extraordinary, but a definite indication of Mr. White's vast potential. These ideas are represented in the following excerpt: "IT IS A DELIBERATE, SERIOUS ATTEMPT AT TRAGEDY, AND JUDG
ED BY THE IMPRESSION OF INTENSE SUFFERING WHICH IT CREATES IT IS A SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT. BUT IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE ESSENTIALLY NEW OR LARGER POWERS...IT IS NO ILL-CONSIDERED OR EXPERIMENTAL STEP, AND IT WILL SURELY DEEPEN THE CONVICTION THAT ITS AUTHOR H
AS POTENTIALITIES SUCH AS ARE OR HAVE BEEN POSSESSED, SO FAR AS WE KNOW, BY NOT MORE THAN TWO OR THREE OTHER AMERICAN WRITERS OF FICTION IN A MANY GOOD YEARS". After giving a short summary of the novel's plot, Williams quickly points out a few shortcome
ings. "GIVEN TWO MEN HUNTING FOR A THIRD IN AN ALMOST IMMEASURABLE STRETCH OF WILDERNESSS, THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR WHAT IS KNOWN AS PLOT ARE NOT APPARENT; THE FACTOR OF HUMAN COMPLICATION SEEMS TO BE REDUCED TO ALMOST ITS ELEMENTS". Though Williams finds fault w
ith the plot structure, he does, however, praise Mr. White for his character development: "THE STUDY OF CHARACTER AND TEMPERAMENT OFFERED IN THE PERSONS OF MAY-MAY-GAWN AND DICK HERRON IS ABOUT THE BEST THING OF THE KIND THAT MR. WHITE HAS YET DONE. IT
IS SANE, CONSISTENT, SINCERE...THE STORY AFFORDS AT ONCE A CNTRAST AND A COMPARISON OF THE QUALITIES OF TWO PERSONS REPRESENTING TWO RACES-THE WHITE AND THE INDIAN". Williams follows this with praise of White's ability to create a vivid mental image of
the wilderness and effects of nature: IT IS THE EFFECT UPON THE MEN OF TOIL AND COLD WHICH IS MOST IMPRESSIVE. MR. WHITE'S SUCCESS IN RECREATING THE ATMOSPHERE OF HTE WILDS AND ESPECIALLY OF THE FOREST HAS BEEN REMARKED UPON AS HIS STRONGEST CLAIM TO PERMANENCY AS A WRITER...". Williams ends by summing up the novel's conclusion, and quiets any questions about the outcome of the hunt by ending with the line: "THE CHASE IS DONE".
The review found in The Dial is not nearly as extensive as Mr. William's found in Bookman. Basically it is a paragraph long review found in the midst of many other reviews of 1904 novels. The majority of the review is devoted to outlining the novel's
plot, but the closing sentence does offer some insight as to how the writer felt about the book: "THE WONDERS OF THE NORTHERN FORESTS THROUGH ALL OF THE FOUR SEASONS, AS WELL AS THE CONTRASTS BETWEEN YOUTH AND AGE, FEMININE DEVOTION AND MASCULINE POWER,
THE INTELLIGENCE OF THE CAUCASIAN AND THE INSTINCT OF THE INDIAN, ARE ALL FINELY DRAWN, WHILE THE KNOWLEDGE OF NATURE INFORMS EVERY PAGE".
The review found in The Nation is very similar to that found in The Dial. The majority of the review is devoted to setting up the plot structure and outling what happens in the book. One of the most revealing lines to how the reviewer receives 'The Sil
ent Places' occurs in the very beginning when the writer states: FEW OF THE STORY-TELLERS WHO GO TO THE UTTERMOST ENDS OF THE EARTH FOR TREASURE FARE SO WELL AS MR. STEWART EDWARD WHITE IN 'THE SILENT PLACES' OF THE NORTH".
Though the review found in Outlook does not provide a plot summary as detailed as both The Dial and The Nation, it does make several remarks on the book as a whole. The review begins by saying "The Silent Places" depicts a natural setting and "ALSO SHOWS
THE ART OF THE FICTION-WRITER IN PRESENTING CLEARLY CHARACTERS WHO ARE DISTINCTLY CONCEIVED, AND IN GETTING OUT OF A STRONG SITUATION CONTINUOUS AND TENSE INTEREST. As the Outlook revies segways into the plot summary, it makes the comment that "THE PLOT
IS SLIGHT, BUT IT MAINTAINS ITS DRAMATIC FORCE THROUGHOUT". The review concludes on a positive note with, "THROUGHOUT, THE ADVENTURES AND RESOURCEFUL SKILL OF THE WOODSMEN ARE NARRATED WITH A KNOWLEDGE AND VIVIDNESS THAT ARE EXTRAORDINARY. AS A ROMANCE
THE BOOK IS MARKED WITH SINGLENESS OF PURPOSE AND HARMONIOUS DEVELOPMENT".
2 Paste subsequent reception history in here (maximum 500 words)
The following lists the sources where critical reviews of Stewart Edward White's 'The Silent Places'can be found:
*1)Bookman Vol 19 pgs 305-307 Ap2. B78 *2)Natiion Vol 78 pgs 499-500 June 23, 1904 *3)Dial Vol 36 pg 370 1904 Ap2. D48 4)Canadian Vol 23 pg 282 1904 Ap5. C12 5)Reader Vol 4 pgs 112-113 June Ap2. N2 *6)Outlook Vol 77 pg 425 June, 18 1904
The following were found in the Facts on File Bibliography of American Fiction 1866-1918 and were catagorized under critical studies. Both may be good sources for critical reviews of 'The Silent Places', but I was unable to personally obtain any inform
ation from them. 1) Judy Alter 'Stewart Edward White 2) Edna Rosemary Butte 'Stewart Edward White; His Life and Literary Career.
I was only able to obtain copies of the reviews found in the Bookman, Nation, Outlook and Dial. There were many similarities between the four different reviews. The most striking similarity was that each review compared Mr. Edward's 'The Silent Places
' to his earlier work, 'Conjurors' House'. All four reviews find the two stories to exhibit many likenesses in both subject matter and setting. The Dial opens with, "Those familiar with Mr. Stewart Edward White's "Conjurors' House" will find the s
ame material used in his latest work "The Silent Places". Mr. Churchill Williams in his Bookman review writes, "The present story (The Silent Places) is of the same genesis as the sketch which was reviewed a year or more ago in these columns under the ti
tle "Conjurors' House"'. Though the Bookman takes the most anaylitical approach, all four reviews devote a majority of their content outlining the book's plot. Each review gives a basic plot line along with the names of important characters and how t
hey contribute to the story. Each review makes reference to White's particular attention to and life-like imagery of Natural settings. The Nation starts off by saying, "Few of the story-tellers who go to the utttermost ends of the earth for treasure fare so well as Mr.
Stewart Edward White". The Bookman review adds, "Of what this wilderness of the North means Mr. White comes nearer to giving us a conception than anyone who has yet written of it". Outlook boasts that White is " a true nature-lover and a master of woodc
raft-two things not often combined in one writer. Though all four reviews share several things in common, the Bookman review inspects the book's literary merit the closest.
Mr. Churchill Williams' review of 'The Silent Places' found in the Bookman provides the most in-depth and complete review of the book. Williams sees 'The Silent Places' as a novel in which Mr. White attempts to explore further into human emotion tha
n any of his earlier works. Yet, Williams views the novel as nothing extraordinary, but a definite indication of Mr. White's vast potential. These ideas are represented in the following excerpt: "IT IS A DELIBERATE, SERIOUS ATTEMPT AT TRAGEDY, AND JUDG
ED BY THE IMPRESSION OF INTENSE SUFFERING WHICH IT CREATES IT IS A SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT. BUT IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE ESSENTIALLY NEW OR LARGER POWERS...IT IS NO ILL-CONSIDERED OR EXPERIMENTAL STEP, AND IT WILL SURELY DEEPEN THE CONVICTION THAT ITS AUTHOR H
AS POTENTIALITIES SUCH AS ARE OR HAVE BEEN POSSESSED, SO FAR AS WE KNOW, BY NOT MORE THAN TWO OR THREE OTHER AMERICAN WRITERS OF FICTION IN A MANY GOOD YEARS". After giving a short summary of the novel's plot, Williams quickly points out a few shortcome
ings. "GIVEN TWO MEN HUNTING FOR A THIRD IN AN ALMOST IMMEASURABLE STRETCH OF WILDERNESSS, THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR WHAT IS KNOWN AS PLOT ARE NOT APPARENT; THE FACTOR OF HUMAN COMPLICATION SEEMS TO BE REDUCED TO ALMOST ITS ELEMENTS". Though Williams finds fault w
ith the plot structure, he does, however, praise Mr. White for his character development: "THE STUDY OF CHARACTER AND TEMPERAMENT OFFERED IN THE PERSONS OF MAY-MAY-GAWN AND DICK HERRON IS ABOUT THE BEST THING OF THE KIND THAT MR. WHITE HAS YET DONE. IT
IS SANE, CONSISTENT, SINCERE...THE STORY AFFORDS AT ONCE A CNTRAST AND A COMPARISON OF THE QUALITIES OF TWO PERSONS REPRESENTING TWO RACES-THE WHITE AND THE INDIAN". Williams follows this with praise of White's ability to create a vivid mental image of
the wilderness and effects of nature: IT IS THE EFFECT UPON THE MEN OF TOIL AND COLD WHICH IS MOST IMPRESSIVE. MR. WHITE'S SUCCESS IN RECREATING THE ATMOSPHERE OF HTE WILDS AND ESPECIALLY OF THE FOREST HAS BEEN REMARKED UPON AS HIS STRONGEST CLAIM TO PERMANENCY AS A WRITER...". Williams ends by summing up the novel's conclusion, and quiets any questions about the outcome of the hunt by ending with the line: "THE CHASE IS DONE".
The review found in The Dial is not nearly as extensive as Mr. William's found in Bookman. Basically it is a paragraph long review found in the midst of many other reviews of 1904 novels. The majority of the review is devoted to outlining the novel's
plot, but the closing sentence does offer some insight as to how the writer felt about the book: "THE WONDERS OF THE NORTHERN FORESTS THROUGH ALL OF THE FOUR SEASONS, AS WELL AS THE CONTRASTS BETWEEN YOUTH AND AGE, FEMININE DEVOTION AND MASCULINE POWER,
THE INTELLIGENCE OF THE CAUCASIAN AND THE INSTINCT OF THE INDIAN, ARE ALL FINELY DRAWN, WHILE THE KNOWLEDGE OF NATURE INFORMS EVERY PAGE".
The review found in The Nation is very similar to that found in The Dial. The majority of the review is devoted to setting up the plot structure and outling what happens in the book. One of the most revealing lines to how the reviewer receives 'The Sil
ent Places' occurs in the very beginning when the writer states: FEW OF THE STORY-TELLERS WHO GO TO THE UTTERMOST ENDS OF THE EARTH FOR TREASURE FARE SO WELL AS MR. STEWART EDWARD WHITE IN 'THE SILENT PLACES' OF THE NORTH".
Though the review found in Outlook does not provide a plot summary as detailed as both The Dial and The Nation, it does make several remarks on the book as a whole. The review begins by saying "The Silent Places" depicts a natural setting and "ALSO SHOWS
THE ART OF THE FICTION-WRITER IN PRESENTING CLEARLY CHARACTERS WHO ARE DISTINCTLY CONCEIVED, AND IN GETTING OUT OF A STRONG SITUATION CONTINUOUS AND TENSE INTEREST. As the Outlook revies segways into the plot summary, it makes the comment that "THE PLOT
IS SLIGHT, BUT IT MAINTAINS ITS DRAMATIC FORCE THROUGHOUT". The review concludes on a positive note with, "THROUGHOUT, THE ADVENTURES AND RESOURCEFUL SKILL OF THE WOODSMEN ARE NARRATED WITH A KNOWLEDGE AND VIVIDNESS THAT ARE EXTRAORDINARY. AS A ROMANCE
THE BOOK IS MARKED WITH SINGLENESS OF PURPOSE AND HARMONIOUS DEVELOPMENT".
Assignment 5: Critical Analysis
1 Paste your critical analysis in here (maximum 2500 words)
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