Grey, Zane: Wildfire
(researched by Stacie Larson)

Assignment 1: Bibliographical Description
1 First edition publication information (publisher, place, date, etc.)
Zane Grey. Wildfire. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1916.
copyright held by Harper & Brothers.
2 First edition published in cloth, paper, or both? If both, simultaneous or staggered?
trade cloth binding, stamped in gilt
front cover: WILDFIRE|(rule 110 mm)|ZANE GREY spine: WILD-|FIRE|(rule 29 mm)|ZANE|GREY|HARPERS
3 JPEG image of cover art from first edition, if available
4 Pagination
168 leaves, not including endpapers pp. [8] 1-9 [10] 11-25 [26] 27-42 [43] 44-57 [58] 59-75 [76] 77-89 [90] 91-98 [99] 100-117 [118] 119-132 [2] 133-134 [135] 136-151 [152] 153-165 [166] 167-183 [184] 185-204 [205] 206-231 [232] 233-247 [248] 249-254 [2] 255-277 [278] 279-284 [285] 286-300
[301] 302-308 [2] 309-311 [312] 313-320 [321] [1]
5 Edited or Introduced? If so, by whom?
N/A
6 Illustrated? If so, by whom?
Black and white plates at frontispiece, facing p. 132, 254, and 308 are illustrated by Frank Tenney Johnson.
7 JPEG image of sample illustration, if available
8 General physical appearance of book (Is the physical presentation of the text attractive? Is the typography readable? Is the book well printed?)
page size: 183 mm x 123 mm text size: 155 mm x 89 mm
This book has a nice size typeface, that is very readable. Illustrations are centered on the plates, with legends centered below them. Type: 72R, serif, type face is consistent throughout
9 JPEG image of sample chapter page, if available
10 Paper (Assess the original quality of the paper used for the book. Is the paper in the copy or copies you examined holding up physically over time?)
Paper is wove paper, with an even, granulated texture. Plates are on glossy stock. Paper has foxing throughout, but it is worst at edges, and at the beginning and end of the
text block.
11 Description of binding(s)
Red cloth binding, stamped in gilt. Frontispiece is protected by tissue paper laid in. All plates are pasted in.
12 Transcription of title page
WILDFIRE|BY|ZANE GREY|AUTHOR OF|"THE RAINBOW TRAIL" "RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE"|"THE BORDER LEGION" ETC.|ILLUSTRATED|(publi
sher's mark)|HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS|NEW YORK AND LONDON
13 JPEG image of title page, if available
14 Manuscript Holdings
undetermined
Brigham Young University, Oregon State University, and the Ohio Historical Association have the largest collections of papers of Zane Grey, but none mention 'Wildfire' by name.
15 Other (typograpical information from title page, etc.)
N/A
Assignment 2: Publication and Performance History
1 Did the original publisher issue the book in more than one edition? If so, briefly describe distinguishing features of each (illustrations, cover art, typography, etc.); if not, enter N/A
No other edition was issued by Harper & Brothers. Reprint rights were sold to Grosset & Dunlap, and paperback rights were sold to Pocket Books.
2 JPEG image of cover art from one subsequent edition, if available
3 JPEG image of sample illustration from one subsequent edition, if available
4 How many printings or impressions of the first edition?
undetermined
5 Editions from other publishers? If so, list their dates and publishers; if not, enter N/A
New York: McKinlay, Stone & Mackenzie, 1916 ("Home Library Edition") Boston: G.K. Hall, c1917 1984 (large print) New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1917 (without illustrations) New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1917 (with illustrations by F.T. Johnson) Mattituck, NY: American Reprint Co., c1917 1945 1989 Roslyn, NY: Walter J. Black, 1917 New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1919 New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1922 (with illustrations by F.T. Johnson, and scenes from a Goldwyn picture) New York: Grosset & Dunlap, c1922 1945 London: T. Nelson and Sons, cuuuu 1925 1929 New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930 - 1961 (v. 52 of the "Great Western Edition" of Zane Grey's works, 60 volumes in all) New York: Black's Reader Service Co., 1945 New York: Pocket Books, c1945 1976 ("Pocket Book Edition") Bath: Chivers Press, c 1945 1988 New York: HarperPaperback, c1945 1990 New York: W.J. Black, 1947 Unknown: Nelson, 1954 ("Nelson Western Series") Cleveland, OH: Greater Chapter American Red Cross, 1958 London: Consul Books, 1965 (abridged edition) New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1971 London: White Lion Publishers, 1974 Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audio Books, 1994 Spokane, WA: Books in Motion, 1995 New York: HarperPaperbacks, 1995 uuuu (published with "Fighting Caravans") Barcelona: Editorial Juventud, 1930 (Spanish - "Huracan", 352p) Barcelona: Juventud, c1930 1970 1975 1983 (Spanish - "Huracan", 311p) Barcelona: Juventud, 1933 (Spanish - "Huracan", 272p) Warszawa: W.M. Arcta, 1936 (Polish - "Plomien") Barcelona: Juventud, 1949 (Spanish - "Huracan", 366p) Lisboa: Agencia Portuguese de Revistas, cuuuu 1957 1960 (Portuguese - "Fogo selvagem") Rijeka: O. Kersovani, 1961 (Serbo-Croatian - "Divlji plamen") Ljubljana: Drzavna Zalozba Slovenije, 1962 (Slovenian - "Prevedel stanko klinar") Milano: Editrice Sonzogno, 1966 (Italian) Madrid: Susaeta, 1970 (Spanish - "Huracan") Budapest: Palladis rt. Kiadasa, 19?? (Hungarian - "Futotuz regeny") T'ai-pei: His tai shu pan ku fen yu hsien kung ssu, 1996 (Chinese - "Ai ch'ing huo la la" T'ai-pei shih: Lin pai ch'u pan she, 1995 (Chinese - "Ai ju yeh huo") NOTE: The Chinese translations may not be of Zane Grey's work.. Only the translators were mentioned, not the original author.
6 Last date in print?
1995 (one a paperback of "Wildfire" alone, and one paperback by HarperPaperbacks with "Wildfire" and "Fighting Caravans")
7 Total copies sold? (source and date of information?)
1,107,754 from A. Hackett's "70 Years of Best Sellers, 1895-1965", 1965
8 Sales figures by year? (source and date of information?)
undetermined
9 Advertising copy (transcribe significant excerpts, briefly identify where ads were placed)
Publishers Weekly, January 20, 1917 We begin the new year - our Century Year - with a Zane Grey novel. Grey has written many books, but here is the best of them all. He has written of wonderful horses, but Wildfire outruns them all. And this book will go like Wildfire once it is started - there will be no stopping it. We have prepared attractive colored posters which we shall be glad to supply on demand. Frontispiece. $1.35 net.
10 JPEG image of sample advertisement, if available
11 Other promotion
12 Performances in other media? If so, list media, date, title, production information; if not, enter N/A
1922 Goldwyn Pictures Corp. "When Romance Rides", adapted by Benjamin B. Hampton 1949 remake by Universal, "Red Canyon."
13 Translations? If translated, give standard bibliographic information for each translation. If none, enter N/A
Barcelona: Editorial Juventud, 1930 (Spanish - "Huracan", 352p) Barcelona: Juventud, c1930 1970 1975 1983 (Spanish - "Huracan", 311p) Barcelona: Juventud, 1933 (Spanish - "Huracan", 272p) Warszawa: W.M. Arcta, 1936 (Polish - "Plomien") Barcelona: Juventud, 1949 (Spanish - "Huracan", 366p) Lisboa: Agencia Portuguese de Revistas, cuuuu 1957 1960 (Portuguese - "Fogo selvagem") Rijeka: O. Kersovani, 1961 (Serbo-Croatian - "Divlji plamen") Ljubljana: Drzavna Zalozba Slovenije, 1962 (Slovenian - "Prevedel stanko klinar") Milano: Editrice Sonzogno, 1966 (Italian) Madrid: Susaeta, 1970 (Spanish - "Huracan") Budapest: Palladis rt. Kiadasa, 19?? (Hungarian - "Futotuz regeny") T'ai-pei: His tai shu pan ku fen yu hsien kung ssu, 1996 (Chinese - "Ai ch'ing huo la la" T'ai-pei shih: Lin pai ch'u pan she, 1995 (Chinese - "Ai ju yeh huo") NOTE: The Chinese translations may not be of Zane Grey's work.. Only the translators were mentioned, not the original author.
14 Serialization? If serialized, give standard bibliographic information for serial publication. If none, enter N/A
Country Gentleman, 1916.
15 Sequels/Prequels? Give standard bibliographic information for each. If none, enter N/A
N/A
Assignment 3: Biographical Sketch of the Author
1 Paste your biographical sketch here (maximum 500 words)
Pearl Zane Gray was born on January 31, 1872, in Zanesville, Ohio, to Lewis Gray and his wife, Alice Josephine Zane. Lewis Gray was a small-town dentist who provided the Grays with a comfortable home. Alice cho
se to name her son Pearl, because she had heard that pearl gray was Queen Victoria's favorite color. When he became a writer, he dropped Pearl, for obvious reasons, and changed Gray to Grey. Grey was an indifferent student, whose greatest loves were fi
shing and playing baseball. Winning a baseball scholarship, Grey attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied dentistry and graduated in 1896. Grey opened a practice in New York City, but often felt his life was missing something, so he tur
ned to writing. His early books were published in the vanity press, using money from his wife's inheritance. Grey's first book, 'Betty Zane' (1903), was the story of one of his ancestors, who had helped pioneer the Ohio River Valley. Zanesville was named for Alice Gray's ancestor, Colonel Ebenezer Zane, a hero of the Revolutionary War, who held Fort Henry,
now in West Virginia. In return for his heroism, George Washington made him a significant land grant in the Ohio River Valley. Zane's Trace was the major route traveled by pioneers from West Virginia to Ohio. Betty Zane was Ebenezer's sister and a he
roine in her own right. When Fort Henry was under siege, Betty dodged bullets and arrows to bring a tablecloth filled with gunpowder to the defenders. Grey was taken with her heroism, and the strength and values she showed. He followed 'Betty Zane' w
ith two more books, 'Spirit of the Border' (1905) and 'The Last Trail' (1906), about the settling of Ohio. 'Last of the Plainsmen' (1908) was Grey's first book to achieve moderate success, and was the first to be published by Harper & Brothers. It was written after Grey traveled to Arizona with Colonel 'Buffalo' Jones, and it was the first of many Wester
n novels. In 1912, Harpers published 'Riders of the Purple Sage,' which was the first Grey novel to make the bestseller list, and it sold over two million copies in Grey's lifetime. With 'Riders of the Purple Sage,' Grey had struck upon a formula t
hat appealed to readers, combining the violence of the West with the passion and romance he felt the pure souls of the West could achieve. Grey continued to exploit this formula, hitting a gold mine in the public. His fifty-six published volumes in twen
ty languages had been read by over thirty million readers by the mid-1950s. With his early success, Grey gave up dentistry and turned to writing full-time. He and his wife moved to the West he loved, and purchased homes throughout the West. Grey was a wealthy man, and used his earnings to do what he loved best - fish. Grey wro
te a dozen volumes on fishing, and some say he inspired 'The Old Man and the Sea.' In 1937, Grey had a heart attack in Oregon on a fishing trip, and though he recovered, his heart was weakened substantially. A second heart attack on October 23, 1939,
in his Los Angeles home was fatal. Though Harpers had published thirty-six novels in Grey's lifetime, nearly two a year, Grey still had many unpublished manuscripts at his death. Harpers was able to publish one every year until 1963, and one more in 1977. Harpers sold reprint rights to
Grosset & Dunlap and paperback rights to Pocket Books, helping to make Grey and enduring fixture in Western literature.
Assignment 4: Reception History
1 Paste contemporary reception history in here (maximum 500 words)
Zane Grey's novel, 'Wildfire,' was issued in January 1917, and quickly made the bestseller list in 'Publishers Weekly.' It had only been five years since the publication of 'Riders of the Purple Sage' and
Harper & Brothers used Grey's name as the primary draw for readers. Though advertised, it was often only included in lists of forthcoming Harpers books, rather than receiving individual attention. In the contemporary media, 'Wildfire' received mixed reviews. Both 'Publishers Weekly' and 'The Dial' reviewers were a little skittish of it being a "horse-book," though both gave it somewhat reluctant positive reviews. 'The Dial' reviewer was
impressed with the Grey's ability to describe the environment, but felt that the rest of the book was forgettable. "The story comes along, gives a few thrills, and if it then fades from the mind, it leaves the impression of the wonderful western canyon
-country and the curious out-of-the-world figures that used to people it." 'Publishers Weekly,' too, liked the environment. "If the editor of the 'Book Review' sends me another Grey book to review, I hope he will enclose a railroad ticket to the Gra
nd Canyon. I want to see that tragic river, the river rocks, and the adjacent stretches of sage, fertile valleys, and dim mountains." 'The Springfield Republican' gave the book a positive review, saying that it was wonderfully in the spirit of Grey's earlier novels, and would do much to enhance his career. But, to balance that, the 'Independent' reviewer wrote, "['Wildfire'] wil
l add nothing to the author's reputation. It lacks the atmosphere of his early novels and falls short of their restrained power. It is a shallow and sensational story." Perhaps the most portentous review came from the 'Boston Transcript.' It did well to foretell the novel's future as a film. "The story would make an excellent foundation for a movie scenario. But still, 'Wildfire' possesses certain virtues of its
own - the virtue of being straight, clean, and exciting, and the virtue of lacking the psychological sickliness and the maundering of much of our third-rate fiction."
2 Paste subsequent reception history in here (maximum 500 words)
Zane Grey's novel, 'Wildfire,' was issued in January 1917, and quickly made the bestseller list in 'Publishers Weekly.' It had only been five years since the publication of 'Riders of the Purple Sage' and
Harper & Brothers used Grey's name as the primary draw for readers. Though advertised, it was often only included in lists of forthcoming Harpers books, rather than receiving individual attention. In the contemporary media, 'Wildfire' received mixed reviews. Both 'Publishers Weekly' and 'The Dial' reviewers were a little skittish of it being a "horse-book," though both gave it somewhat reluctant positive reviews. 'The Dial' reviewer was
impressed with the Grey's ability to describe the environment, but felt that the rest of the book was forgettable. "The story comes along, gives a few thrills, and if it then fades from the mind, it leaves the impression of the wonderful western canyon
-country and the curious out-of-the-world figures that used to people it." 'Publishers Weekly,' too, liked the environment. "If the editor of the 'Book Review' sends me another Grey book to review, I hope he will enclose a railroad ticket to the Gra
nd Canyon. I want to see that tragic river, the river rocks, and the adjacent stretches of sage, fertile valleys, and dim mountains." 'The Springfield Republican' gave the book a positive review, saying that it was wonderfully in the spirit of Grey's earlier novels, and would do much to enhance his career. But, to balance that, the 'Independent' reviewer wrote, "['Wildfire'] wil
l add nothing to the author's reputation. It lacks the atmosphere of his early novels and falls short of their restrained power. It is a shallow and sensational story." Perhaps the most portentous review came from the 'Boston Transcript.' It did well to foretell the novel's future as a film. "The story would make an excellent foundation for a movie scenario. But still, 'Wildfire' possesses certain virtues of its
own - the virtue of being straight, clean, and exciting, and the virtue of lacking the psychological sickliness and the maundering of much of our third-rate fiction."
Assignment 5: Critical Analysis
1 Paste your critical analysis in here (maximum 2500 words)
Zane Grey, called by some the Father of the Western, discovered a genre that appealed to the American public like no other. At the height of his popularity, there were more copies of his books than any other
, save the Bible and McGuffey's Readers.<1> Other authors, like Owen Wister and James Fenimore Cooper, have written about the frontier, but Grey's combination of "brutal violence and saccharine romance - a heady mixture all but unknown to his predece
ssors,"<2> won readers by the millions. Grey's novels were primarily romances, stories of the fiery passions that blazed between the strong, pure men and women of the West. One of the major criticisms of Grey's later work is that it was unoriginal. The formulaic nature of the stories was exciting in the early novels, but routine for the later ones. According to Arthur Kimball, one formula, which he called Formula ZG,
served for the majority of Grey's novels. Formula ZG goes like this:
A romantic adventure story set in the West. Two westerners, often two couples, find true love, marriage, and, unless they already have it, wealth, after overcoming obstacles in a lawless environment (which has other 'laws'). Some protagonists are
from the East. The majestic western land confronts them: beauty, vastness, physical challenge, renewing spirit, and fresh start; they respond, westerners demonstrating appreciation and the fitness for survival demanded, easterners and scarred others so
on acquiring those traits. Outlaw violence also confronts them: rustling, cheating, gunplay, and threats of seductions, the latter enhancing the erotic appeal; they respond with fists and guns. Splendid horses frequently aid the protagonists. Indians,
either as enemies or victims, often constitute a disturbing presence.<3>
There were, of course, some differences across the novels. 'Wildfire' and 'Tappan's Burro,' for example, have horses with major roles, and Indians play only a minor role in 'Wildfire.' 'Wildfire's' most memorable aspect is that of its environment. 'Wildfire' takes place in the Grand Canyon, at a ford of the Colorado River. Beauty and vastness are at their apex here, and Grey does a superb job of describing the Canyon to his
readers. Readers almost feel that they are seeing the raging red river, the rocky, broken crags, and the sheer enormity of the Canyon themselves. Mary Alden Hopkins, from 'Publishers Weekly,' felt the same way. "If the editor of the 'Book Review' s
ends me another Grey book to review, I hope he will enclose a railroad ticket to the Grand Canyon. I want to see that tragic river, the river rocks, and the adjacent stretches of sage, fertile valleys, and dim mountains."<4> The reviewer from the 'Dial
' was equally impressed with the imagery, if not the story. "The story carries one along, gives a few thrills, and if it then fades from the mind, it leaves the impression of the wonderful western canyon-country and the curious out-of-the-world figures
that used to people it."<5> Zane Grey was a prolific writer, who used his ever-growing income to finance fishing trips across the country, and even a trek across Australia. However, writing was not just a way to make money. It was also a way to make a statement. In the first
quarter of the twentieth century, great changes were taking place across the country. Women were seeking the right to vote, minorities were seeking to lift themselves out of de facto slavery, and World War I was raging across Europe. Gary Topping, one
of Grey's biographers focused on Grey's social theory.
The social criticism in Grey's novels is one of their most interesting aspects. While studying Grey's social ideas, though, one must not forget that Grey was not a systematic social theorist - he was primarily a novelist - and his ideas never appe
ar in the thorough and consistent forms that intellectual historians would like to have. The two fundamental components of Grey's social theory are a kind of secular Calvinism and Social Darwinism. Humanity can be divided roughly into two general categories: the elect and the damned, the fundamentally good and the fundamentally evil.<
6>
Natural selection determined a person's role in society. The good would rise to the top and the evil would sink to the bottom. Grey felt that there were problems with modern society - women trying to reach beyond their destiny as wives and mothers, peo
ple trying to achieve materialist goals, and people distancing themselves from their roots in nature. Modern society was interfering with natural selection, and the true virtues were going unnoticed. "Consequently, spontaneous emotions, primitive streng
ths and capabilities, and stoical virtues have given way to artificial patterns of behavior, effeminacy, and materialism."<7> For Grey, the West was a means of redemption for a lost society. By returning to the primitive way of life and thought, Man could save himself from the corruption of modern life. In many of Grey's novels, characters from the East arrive in the Wes
t to find themselves in an alien world, where charm and refinement did little to help them. During their sojourn, these corrupted folk find true strength within themselves to withstand the challenges of the wilderness, and most decide to remain in their
natural state of grace in the West, denying the lure of modernity. This is not to say that Grey thought everyone should move to the Rockies, build cabins, and become Mountain Men. In fact, it was quite the opposite. Just as a lone wolf is a danger in the wilderness, and has no pack to cheer him or support him in his t
ime of need, so too is a lone man. Many novels feature heroes who were in the mountains or the wild alone, at peace with themselves, and yet missing some integral part of themselves. These heroes are ultimately brought into contact with others by accide
nt or design, often by girls, where they learn that what they need is the human touch. They become important members of the small communities of the West. Often these heroes have shady pasts, with a lot of violence and death. By becoming part of the pa
ck once more, the solitary heroes find peace.<8> 'Wildfire' has such a hero. Jim Slone was orphaned at a young age when his parents were killed in an Indian attack of a wagon train. He went from place to place, but the majority of his hard, young life was spent in Utah and Texas, lands of great
difficulty and brutality. He became a wild horse hunter, working alone to catch horses of beauty and intelligence. Wildfire was a magnificent red stallion and Slone stalked him for months, before finally trapping him with a wildfire in a small offshoot
of the Grand Canyon. Slone's life was filled with the hunt. It gave him purpose and filled his days. But, even so, Slone was just a wolf without a pack. "And suddenly he felt absolutely free, alone, with nothing behind to remember, with wild, thrill
ing nameless life before him. Just then the long mourn of a timber wolf wailed in with the wind. Seldom had he heard the cry of one of those night wanderers. There was nothing like it - no sound like it to fix in the lone camper's heart the great soli
tude and the wild."<9> Slone arrives in the small hamlet of Bostil's Ford with Wildfire, whom he enters in a great horse race. Lucy Bostil, the heroine, has some trouble with the crazed Joel Creech, who has vowed to strip Lucy naked and run her through town, in retaliati
on for a girlish prank she had played on him, stealing his clothes while he swam. At the climax of the novel, Creech has followed through on his threat and it is up to Slone and Wildfire to save Lucy, tied naked to the back of her father's horse, Sage K
ing, from a grass fire that Creech set. Slone does save Lucy, but Wildfire gave his life outrunning the wildfire, a sacrifice to Grey's ultimate goal - true love between man and woman in their natural state. It is important to note here that the naked Lucy proves another of Grey's points. Grey felt that promiscuity was immoral and upsetting to the natural order of things. In later novels, Grey rages about the flagrant disregard for respectable behavio
r exhibited by the flappers. In several stories, Grey pairs the hero and heroine in compromising situations, with both parties stirred to great passions, but, importantly, they do not act on their feelings. Their state of grace prevents them from taking
such a step. The nobility shown by his lone wolf, Slone, in not taking advantage of the situation, helps to bring him into the fold. Grey believed that strong emotions were natural in the strong men and women of the West, but that being swept away by t
hose emotions was counter to their moral code. "Appropriately, passion 'running wild' is the real destroyer, its consuming nature suggested in both blazing grass and wild stallion which become, in part, its symbols. Desire run amok must burn itself ou
t, prove lethal, self-destruct."<10> Wildfire is multi-faceted work. The title itself refers to many things.
Grey, perhaps, did not intend the term 'wildfire' to signify anything in particular. Few authors deliberately write symbolism into their own stories. But for this novel, 'wildfire' was a horse, it was a condition (Joel Creech's setting the grass fi
re turned the surroundings into an inferno [and it was wildfire which had trapped the horse for Slone]), and it was a frame of mind. The sacrifice of Wildfire's life set loose the positive events that had been impossible before: the gentle acts of Bost
il, and the fulfillment of true love between Lucy and Slone. Thus, sacrifice - on this occasion, a horse's - was made an important key to happiness.<11>
It was one of Zane Grey's earlier novels, and he perfected his social theory, and the plots around it, through this and other works. Later novels may have a more fully developed theory, but 'Wildfire' shows the structure and foundation of that theory.

-------------------- <1> Jackson, Carlton "Grey, Zane" 'American National Biography' (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999) ed. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, p. 578. <2> Goble, Danney "The Days That Were No More" 'Journal of Arizona History' v. 14 (September 1973) p. 64. <3> Kimball, Arthur G. 'Ace of Hearts: The Westerns of Zane Grey' (Ft. Worth, TX: Texas Christian University Press, 1993) pp. 19-20. <4> Hopkins, Mary Alden "Wildfire" 'Publishers Weekly' January 20, 1917, p. 210. <5> "Wildfire" 'Dial' v. 62 (1917: Jan 11/June 14) p. 104. <6> Topping, Gary "Zane Grey (1872-1939) 'Fifty Western Writers, A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook' (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982) ed. Fred Erisman and Richard W. Etulain, p. 155. <7> Ibid. <8> Topping, Gary "Zane Grey's West" 'Journal of Popular Culture' v. 7, p. 681-689. <9> Grey, Zane 'Wildfire' (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1916) pp. 57-58. <10> Kimball, p. 33. <11> Jackson, Carlton 'Zane Grey' (New York: Twayne Publishers, Inc., 1973) pp. 88-89.
Supplemental Material
Sources Consulted Assignment 1 WorldCat Eureka National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections Assignment 2 WorldCat Eureka National Union Catalog Pre-1956 Imprints United States Catalog The British Library General Catalogue of Printed Books to 1975 Bibliographie de la litterature francaise Publishers Weekly Books in Print 1998-1999 Whitaker's Books in Print A. Hackett's 70 Years of Best Sellers 1895 - 1965 (1965) Magill's Survey of Cinema Assignment 3 Goble, Danney, "The Days That Were No More" Journal of Arizona History September, 1973, v. 14, pp. 63-75. Jackson, Carlton, "Grey, Zane" American National Biography (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999) v. 9, pp. 577-578. Topping, Gary, "Zane Grey's West" Journal of Popular Culture 1973, v. 7, pp. 681-689. __________, "Zane Grey, 1872-1939" Fifty Western Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook Fred Erisman and Richard W. Etulain, ed., (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982) pp. 152-161. Assignment 4 Topping, Gary, "Zane Grey's West" Journal of Popular Culture 1973, v. 7, pp. 681-689. __________, "Zane Grey, 1872-1939" Fifty Western Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook Fred Erisman and Richard W. Etulain, ed., (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982) pp. 152-161. The Dial (1917: Jan 11/June 14) v. 62, p. 104. Publishers Weekly (January 20, 1917) v. 91, p. 210. The Independent (April 7, 1917) v. 90, p. 87. Boston Transcript (March 17, 1917) p. 7. Springfield Republican (March 11, 1917) p. 17. Assignment 5 Goble, Danney "The Days That Were No More" 'Journal of Arizona History' v. 14 (September 1973) pp. 63-75. Jackson, Carlton "Grey, Zane" 'American National Biography' (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999) ed. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, pp. 577-578. Jackson, Carlton 'Zane Grey' (New York: Twayne Publishers, Inc., 1973). Hopkins, Mary Alden "Wildfire" 'Publishers Weekly' January 20, 1917, p. 210. Kimball, Arthur G. 'Ace of Hearts: The Westerns of Zane Grey' (Ft. Worth, TX: Texas Christian University Press, 1993). Topping, Gary "Zane Grey (1872-1939) 'Fifty Western Writers, A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook' (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982) ed. Fred Erisman and Richard W. Etulain, pp. 152-161. Topping, Gary "Zane Grey's West" 'Journal of Popular Culture' v. 7, pp. 681-689. "Wildfire" 'Dial' v. 62 (1917: Jan 11/June 14) p. 104. Grey, Zane 'Wildfire' (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1916).
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